Advisory Council & Author

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John M. Deutch

Institute Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

John M. Deutch is an emeritus Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Deutch has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1970, and has served as Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, Dean of Science and Provost. Deutch has published over 140 technical publications in physical chemistry, as well as numerous publications on technology, energy, international security, and public policy issues.

Deutch has served in significant government and academic posts throughout his career. In May 1995, he was sworn in as Director of Central Intelligence following a unanimous vote in the Senate, and served as DCI until December 1996. In this position, he was head of the Intelligence Community (all foreign intelligence agencies of the United States) and directed the Central Intelligence Agency. From March 1994 to May 1995, he served as the Deputy Secretary of Defense. From March 1993 to March 1994, Dr. Deutch served as Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisitions and Technology.

From 1977 to 1980, Deutch served in a number of positions for the U.S. Department of Energy: as Director of Energy Research, Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Technology, and Undersecretary of the Department.

In addition Deutch has served on many commissions during several presidential administrations. He has served on the President’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee (1980-81); the President’s Commission on Strategic Forces (1983); the White House Science Council (1985-89); the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (1997-2001), the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (1990-93); the President’ Commission on Aviation Safety and Security (1996); the Commission on Reducing and Protecting Government Secrecy (1996); and as Chairman of the Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (1998-99).

Deutch has received fellowships and honors from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1978) and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (Research Fellow 1967-69), and John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (Memorial Fellow 1974-1975).  Public Service Medals have been awarded him from the Department of Energy (1980), the Department of State (1980), the Department of Defense (1994 and 1995), the Department of the Army (1995), the Department of the Navy (1995), the Department of the Air Force (1995), the Coast Guard (1995), the Central Intelligence Distinguished Intelligence Medal (1996) and the Intelligence Community Distinguished Intelligence Medal (1996). He received the Greater Boston Federal Executive Board’s Speaker Thomas P. O’Neill Award for exemplary public service in 2002, the Aspen Strategy Group Leadership Award in 2004, and he was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2007. He delivered the 2010 Godkin Lectures on the Essentials of Free Government and the Duties of the Citizen.  He is a member of the National Petroleum Council (2008) and co-chair of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. (2010).

Deutch earned a B.A. in history and economics from Amherst College, and both the B.S. in chemical engineering and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from M.I.T. He holds honorary degrees from Amherst College, University of Lowell, and Northeastern University. He serves as director for the following publicly held companies: Citigroup, Raytheon and Cheniere Energy. He is a trustee of Center of American Progress, Resources for the Future, the Massachusetts Hospital Physician Organization, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


Related to John M. Deutch

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Real Specifics: 15 Ways to Rethink the Federal Budget—Part I: Budgeting for a Modern Military—Full Audio

February 22, 2013 • Audio

On February 22nd, The Hamilton Project at Brookings hosted a forum and released new proposals on ways to create greater efficiency in the U.S. defense budget while maintaining our national security. Former Treasury Secretary gave opening remarks before retired four-star Admiral Gary Roughead, a former chief of Naval Operations; Kori Schake, a reserach fellow at the Hoover Institution; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Cindy Williams, a former assistant director of the Congressional Budget Office, offered two new proposals for reducing future defense budgets. The authors were joined by former Deputy Secretary of Defense John Deutch, former Undersecretary for Defense Michèle Flournoy, and former Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) for a roundtable discussion on the new proposals, and a broader discussion around the dynamics of ongoing defense budget negotiations.  Following the roundtable, the panelists took audience questions.

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Real Specifics: 15 Ways to Rethink the Federal Budget—Part I: Budgeting for a Modern Military—Photo Gallery

February 22, 2013 • Photo Galleries

THP’s two-part budget series kicked off on Feb. 22nd with a forum on the defense budget, which included a lively roundtable discussion with Fmr. Sen. Sam Nunn (D-GA), Adm. Gary Roughead (USN Ret.) and other distinguished experts.

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Real Specifics:  15 Ways to Rethink the Federal Budget—Part I:  Budgeting for a Modern Military

Events • February 22, 2013 • Washington, DC

On February 22nd, The Hamilton Project at Brookings hosted  a forum and released new proposals on ways to create greater efficiency in the U.S. defense budget while maintaining our national security. Retired four-star Admiral Gary Roughead, a former chief of Naval Operations; Kori Schake, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Cindy Williams, a former assistant director of the Congressional Budget Office, offered two new proposals for reducing future defense budgets.

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America’s Energy Future: Welcome and Panel 1: New Policies for a Cleaner Economy

May 18, 2011 • Audio

Full audio from Welcome and Panel 1: "New Policies for a Cleaner Economy" at the event America’s Energy Future: New Solutions to Fuel Economic Growth and Prosperity.

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An Energy Technology Corporation Will Improve the Federal Government’s Efforts to Accelerate Energy Innovation

Papers • May 2011 • John M. Deutch

John M. Deutch proposes a series of best practices for government support of U.S. technology demonstration and a new institution, the Energy Technology Corporation, that would be responsible for managing and selecting technology demonstration projects.

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America’s Energy Future: New Solutions to Fuel Economic Growth and Prosperity

Events • May 18, 2011 • Washington, DC

America’s current energy system poses long-term threats to national security, health, and the environment. On May 18, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum on America’s energy future, focusing on strategies to give all energy sources equal footing in the marketplace and expand America’s opportunities to utilize cleaner, low-cost sources of energy. 

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America’s Energy Future: New Solutions to Fuel Economic Growth and Prosperity Photos

May 18, 2011 • Photo Galleries

The recent climb in gasoline prices to $4 per gallon is the latest headwind facing the U.S. economy. In addition to this threat to economic growth, America’s current energy system poses long-term threats to national security, health, and the environment. On May 18, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum on America’s energy future, focusing on strategies to give all energy sources equal footing in the marketplace and expand America’s opportunities to utilize cleaner, low-cost sources of energy.

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A Climate of Change: Event Photos

October 30, 2007 • Photo Galleries

The Hamilton Project hosted a forum highlighting a new strategy paper and two new discussion papers on how to best design market mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including proposals to expand the federal R&D program to better promote the development of new greenhouse gas reducing technologies.
 

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A Climate of Change Full Video

October 30, 2007 • Video

Full video from the A Climate of Change: Economic Approaches to Reforming Energy and Protecting the Environment Hamilton Project event.

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A Climate of Change: Economic Approaches to Reforming Energy and Protecting the Environment

Events • October 30, 2007 • Washington, DC

The Hamilton Project hosted a forum highlighting a new strategy paper and two new discussion papers on how to best design market mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including proposals to expand the federal R&D program to better promote the development of new greenhouse gas-reducing technologies.


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