Author

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Joseph E. Aldy

Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Joseph E. Aldy is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation.


Related to Joseph E. Aldy

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Real Specifics: 15 Ways to Rethink the Federal Budget—Part II: Addressing Entitlements, Taxation and Revenues—Panel 2: Innovative Approaches to Tax Reform

February 28, 2013 • Video

Vice President and Co-Director of Economic Studies at The Brookings Institution Karen Dynan; Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute Alan Viard; Senior Fellow and Policy Director of The Hamilton Project Adam Looney; Chief Economist at Pew Charitable Trusts Diane Lim; and Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government Joseph E. Aldy participate in a roundtable discussion on innovative approaches to tax reform moderated by President of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Robert Greenstein.

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Eliminating Fossil Fuel Subsidies

Papers • February 2013 • Joseph E. Aldy

Limiting subsidies for fossil fuels could raise revenue for the federal government while also benefiting the environment. Joseph Aldy proposes eliminating twelve subsidies to help level the playing field among fossil fuel producers relative to other businesses, and lead to potentially lower global fuel prices by providing the United States with increased leverage in negotiations over eliminating fossil fuel subsides in the developing world.

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America’s Energy Future: Welcome and Panel 1: New Policies for a Cleaner Economy

May 18, 2011 • Audio

Full audio from Welcome and Panel 1: "New Policies for a Cleaner Economy" at the event America’s Energy Future: New Solutions to Fuel Economic Growth and Prosperity.

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Promoting Clean Energy in the American Power Sector

Papers • May 2011 • Joseph E. Aldy

Joseph E. Aldy proposes a national clean energy standard that would lower carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 60 percent relative to 2005 levels over twenty years, streamline the fragmented regulatory system that is currently in place, generate fiscal benefits, and help fund energy innovation.

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America’s Energy Future: New Solutions to Fuel Economic Growth and Prosperity

Events • May 18, 2011 • Washington, DC

America’s current energy system poses long-term threats to national security, health, and the environment. On May 18, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum on America’s energy future, focusing on strategies to give all energy sources equal footing in the marketplace and expand America’s opportunities to utilize cleaner, low-cost sources of energy. 

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America’s Energy Future: New Solutions to Fuel Economic Growth and Prosperity Photos

May 18, 2011 • Photo Galleries

The recent climb in gasoline prices to $4 per gallon is the latest headwind facing the U.S. economy. In addition to this threat to economic growth, America’s current energy system poses long-term threats to national security, health, and the environment. On May 18, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum on America’s energy future, focusing on strategies to give all energy sources equal footing in the marketplace and expand America’s opportunities to utilize cleaner, low-cost sources of energy.


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