In the News

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Charted: More than ever, Americans need a college degree to get by

Quartz • April 23, 2015 • Max Nisen

"...Men who don’t have a high school degree are earning 20% less than they were two decades ago, according to an analysis from the Hamilton Project, a group at the Brookings Institution, a Washington DC-based think tank focused on making economic growth more broadly based. (All the data in the report covers people in what are usually their prime earning years, 30-45.)..."

American needs a new economic plan to stop leaving workers behind

The Street • April 23, 2015 • John Mason

"...So states Melissa S. Kearney in the New York Times. Kearney is the director of the Hamilton Project at the centrist think tank Brookings Institution. She is part of a team studying the changes in the labor market for less educated workers. The results of the study are quite dramatic... For example, from 1990 to 2013, the median earnings of working men aged 30 to 45 without a high school diploma fell 20%..."

The 401(k) millionaire: When is it realistic?

Morning Star • April 22, 2015 • John Rekenthaler

"...For wages, we'll use two projections of lifetime salary expectations, both expressed in today's dollars. The source is the Hamilton Project, a wing of the Brookings Institution. The first, more conservative projection is Hamilton's estimate of the year-by-year salary curve for the average college grad, assuming all majors. The second, more aggressive projection is Hamilton's estimate for economics grads--economics being a relatively lucrative major, although not the highest (trailing several engineering majors, for example)..."

An outdated tax penalty for some married couples

Wall Street Journal • April 22, 2015 • Richard Reeves

"...But there is another story here: The tax system is much kinder to “traditional” couples–ones that have a sole breadwinner–than couples in which wives and husbands share responsibility for bringing home the bacon...As economist Melissa Kearney–a Brookings Institution colleague of mine–put it: “the tax and transfer system has an inherent secondary-earner penalty.”..."

Happy days are not here for all boomtowners

The Seattle Times • April 22, 2015 • Jon Talton

"...New research from the Hamilton Project shows that workers with high-school diplomas or less are doing particularly badly. Working men aged 30 to 45 have seen their median earnings adjusted for inflation decline 20 percent from 1990 to 2013. Median earnings fall 13 percent for men with some college..."

The fight against 15

Slate • April 22, 2015 • Reihan Salam

"...One scholar who has been particularly thoughtful as to why this matters is Dube himself, who has argued against a one-size-fits-all approach to the minimum wage. In a paper for the Hamilton Project, Dube observed that “states as dissimilar as Massachusetts and Mississippi have different capacities to absorb a minimum wage of, say, $11.00 per hour, and a single minimum wage has to balance the needs of states at both ends of the spectrum.”..."

Why lack of education is crushing workers

Politico - Morning Money • April 22, 2015 • Ben White

“Perhaps the single most shocking number in a new review of employment and earnings data by researchers at the Hamilton Project, a research group within the Brookings Institution, is this one: The median earnings of working men aged 30 to 45 without a high school diploma fell 20 percent from 1990 to 2013 when adjusted for inflation. A group of people not earning much to begin with, in other words, has seen earnings plummet to $25,500 in 2013 from $31,900 in 1990 (both numbers are in 2013 dollars).

Happy days are not here for all boomtowners

The Seattle Times • April 22, 2015 • Jon Talton

"...New research from the Hamilton Project shows that workers with high-school diplomas or less are doing particularly badly. Working men aged 30 to 45 have seen their median earnings adjusted for inflation decline 20 percent from 1990 to 2013. Median earnings fall 13 percent for men with some college..."

Larry Summers on why government matters

innovation Hub • April 21, 2015

"Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers gives a candid conversation about why we aren’t funding science the way we need to, what’s wrong with our education system, and how the tech landscape has changed for women since those controversial comments ten years ago."

The long-term unemployment trap

National Journal • April 21, 2015 • Nancy Cook

"...Washington politics may suffer from terrible gridlock, but politicians from both the right and left support an interesting idea of offering relocation subsidies to the long-term unemployed to help them move from one area of high unemployment to a place with a better job market. A 2010 paper from the Hamilton Project at Brookings estimates that relocation subsidies would cost the federal government less than $1 billion a year and would result in as many as 62,000 matches between workers and new jobs..."

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