Multimedia: Education

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The Wireless Spectrum and the Future of Technology Innovation - Keynote Remarks

March 24, 2014 • Video

On March 24th, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum and released a new policy proposal addressing key challenges with the allocation and regulation of wireless spectrum during a time of rapid change and increasing demand. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Thomas Wheeler delivered keynote remarks. He was introduced by Roger C. Altman.

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Highest Educational Attainment of Family Head, by Income Relative to the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)

December 19, 2013 • Charts

College attainment differs markedly by poverty status. 33 percent of household family heads below 100 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) attended at least some college, although just 6 percent of those family heads have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Among household family heads with income between 100 and 250 percent of the FPL, 48 percent have attended some college, and 14 percent have a bachelor’s degree or higher. In stark contrast to those living at or below 250 percent of the FPL, 77 percent of household family heads above 250 percent of the FPL attended at least some college, and about half have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Only a very small share of this group (4 percent) did not earn a high school diploma.

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Introduction and Panel 1

October 21, 2013 • Video

Following welcoming remarks by Evercore Founder and Chairman Roger Altman, Vassar College's Catharine Bond Hill, Wellesley College's Phillip Levine, Laguardia Community College's Gail Mellow, Urban Institute's Sandy Baum, and Columbia University's Judith Scott-Clayton joined a roundtable discussion moderated by The Hamilton Project's Melissa Kearney on restructuring our approach to financial aid. 

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Panel 2

October 21, 2013 • Video

University of Michigan's Susan Dynarski, Princeton University's Greg Kaplan, Vassar College's Catharine Bond Hill, and the Brookings Institution's Grover "Russ" Whitehurst joined a panel discussion moderated by MIT's Michael Greenstone on making borrowing work for today’s students through income-contingent repayment.

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Panel 3

October 21, 2013 • Video

Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin moderated a panel discussion on the role of education with University of Texas Chancellor Francisco G. Cigarroa, Wesleyan University President Michael Roth, and University of North Carolina President Thomas Ross at The Hamilton Project's recent event, "Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education."

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Introduction and Panel 1

October 21, 2013 • Audio

Following welcoming remarks by Evercore Founder and Chairman Roger Altman, Vassar College's Catharine Bond Hill, Wellesley College's Phillip Levine, Laguardia Community College's Gail Mellow, Urban Institute's Sandy Baum, and Columbia University's Judith Scott-Clayton joined a roundtable discussion moderated by The Hamilton Project's Melissa Kearney on restructuring our approach to financial aid. 

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Panel 2

October 21, 2013 • Audio

University of Michigan's Susan Dynarski, Princeton University's Greg Kaplan, Vassar College's Catharine Bond Hill, and the Brookings Institution's Grover "Russ" Whitehurst joined a panel discussion moderated by MIT's Michael Greenstone on making borrowing work for today’s students through income-contingent repayment.

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Panel 3

October 21, 2013 • Audio

Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin moderated a panel discussion on the role of education with University of Texas Chancellor Francisco G. Cigarroa, Wesleyan University President Michael Roth, and University of North Carolina President Thomas Ross.

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Improving College Outcomes: A Modern Approach to Financing Higher Education—Photo Gallery

October 21, 2013 • Photo Galleries

On October 21st The Hamilton Project hosted a forum focusing on the evolving role of higher education in American society and release three new policy proposals by outside experts on how changes in student lending and financial-aid policies can help improve college outcomes.Thought leaders in higher education from around the country joined the discussion, including Vassar College President Catharine Bond Hill; University of Texas ChancellorFrancisco G. Cigarroa; LaGuardia Community College President Gail Mellow; University of North Carolina President Thomas Ross; Wesleyan University President Michael Roth; and Brookings’ Brown Center on Education Policy Director Grover "Russ" Whitehurst.  

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Comprehensive Costs, Net Costs, and Instructional Expenditures per Student

July 18, 2013 • Charts

Surprisingly, the most competitive colleges cost the least for low-income students while providing the most instructional expenditure per student.  The most competitive colleges spend over $25,000 on instructional expenditure for each student yet the average low- income family pays less than $8,000 out of pocket for these schools.  At the least selective four year colleges, low-income families pay over $15,000 out of pocket yet their students receive only around $5000 in instructional expenditure.  

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Application Behavior of High-Achieving Students

July 18, 2013 • Charts

Although they have similar test scores and aptitudes, high- and low- income, high achieving students have strikingly different college application behaviors.  In this figure, panel A shows that high-achieving, high-income students tend to apply to colleges and universities where their test scores closely match the test scores of typical students at those institutions.  Panel B shows that high-achieving, low-income students mostly apply to institutions that are less selective.  Only a small fraction of high-achieving, low-income students apply to schools where their achievement is similar to that of their fellow student.  

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Returns to Education Compared to Other Investments

July 18, 2013 • Charts

Despite rising tuition costs and increased student debt burden, the rate of return of investing in a college education is still much higher than other conventional investments.   The average rates of return of receiving an associate’s, bachelor’s, or professional degree are all over nine percentage points higher than the average returns from investing in stocks.  Surprisingly, the return to attending some college and dropping out before graduating is 9.1 percent, higher than the return to investing in stocks, gold, 10-Year Treasury bonds, T-Bills, and the housing market.  

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Income Quintile of Adults Born into Lowest-Quintile Families by College Attainment

July 18, 2013 • Charts

The earnings of college graduates are much higher than for nongraduates, and that is especially true among people born into low-income families. As the figure shows, without a college degree a child born into a family in the lowest quintile has a 45 percent change of remaining in that quintile as an adult and only a 5 percent chance of moving into the highest quintile. On the other hand, children born into the lowest quintile who do earn a college degree have only a 16 percent chance of remaining in the lowest quintile and a 19 percent chance of breaking into the top quintile. 

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Socioeconomic Distribution at Colleges by Selectivity

July 18, 2013 • Charts

The gap between high- and low-income groups in college outcomes extends beyond college graduation rates. This figure demonstrates that the most-competitive colleges are attended almost entirely by students from higher-socioeconomic status households. Indeed, the more competitive the institution, the greater the percentage of the student body that comes from the top quartile, and the smaller the percentage from the bottom quartile. In fact, at institutions with the most selective admissions standards, the wealthiest students out-populate the poorest students by a margin of fourteen to one. By contrast, students of the lowest-socioeconomic status are over-represented at institutions ranked as less-competitive and non-competitive. 

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Enrichment Expenditures on Children

July 18, 2013 • Charts

One significant consequence of growing income inequality is that, by historical standards, high-income households are spending much more on their children’s education than low-income households. This figure shows enrichment expenditures—SAT prep, private tutors, computers, music lessons, and the like—by income level. Over the past four decades, families at the top of the income ladder have increased spending in these areas dramatically, from just over $3,500 to nearly $9,000 per child per year (in constant 2008 dollars). By comparison, those at the bottom of the income distribution have increased their spending since the early 1970s from less than $850 to about $1,300. The difference is still stark: high-income families have gone from spending slightly more than four times as much as low-income families to nearly seven times more.

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Probability of Children’s Income Level, Given Parents’ Income Level

July 18, 2013 • Charts

 

While social mobility and economic opportunity are important aspects of the American ethos, the data suggest they are more myth than reality. In fact, a child’s family income plays a dominant role in determining his or her future income, and those who start out poor are likely to remain poor. This figure shows the chances that a child’s future earnings will place him in the lowest the or the highest quintile depending on where his parents fell in the distribution (from left to right on the figure, the lowest, middle, and highest quintiles). In a completely mobile society, all children would have the same likelihood of ending up in any part of the income distribution; in this case, all bars in the figure would be at 20 percent, denoted by the bold line. The figure demonstrates that children of well-off families are disproportionately likely to stay well off and children of poor families are very likely to remain poor.

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The Relationship Between Income Inequality and Social Mobility

July 18, 2013 • Charts

 

Many are concerned that rising income inequality will lead to declining social mobility. This figure, recently coined “The Great Gatsby Curve,” takes data from several countries at a single point in time to show the relationship between inequality and immobility. Inequality is measured using Gini coefficients, a common metric that economists use to determine how much of a nation’s income is concentrated among the wealthy; social mobility is measured using intergenerational earnings elasticity, an indicator of how much children’s future earnings depend on the earnings of their parents. Although, as the figure shows, higher levels of inequality are positively correlated with reductions in social mobility, we do not know whether inequality causes reductions in mobility. After all, there are many important factors that vary between countries that might explain this relationship. Nonetheless, this figure represents a provocative observation with potentially important policy ramifications.

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The Economic Imperative of Expanding College Opportunity—Introduction & Panel 1

June 26, 2013 • Video

Following remarks by former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin, Caroline Hoxby of Stanford University presented a new proposal that outlines a strategy for targeting and reaching low-income, high-achieving students and providing them with the information necessary to help facilitate their application to selective colleges. William Fitzsimmons of Harvard College, Nicole Farmer Hurd of the National College Advising Corps, and Robert Gordon of The Brookings Institution joined a roundtable discussion on the proposal, moderated by Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone.

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The Economic Imperative of Expanding College Opportunity—Panel 2

June 26, 2013 • Video

New York Times Washington Bureau Chief David Leonhardt moderated a discussion on the role of higher education in American mobility with Nancy Cantor of Syracuse University, David Coleman of The College Board, Brit Kirwan of the University System of Maryland, and Jon Whitmore of ACT, Inc.

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The Economic Imperative of Expanding College Opportunity—Photo Gallery

June 26, 2013 • Photo Galleries

On June 26th, The Hamilton Project held a forum on the importance of expanding college opportunity for more Americans.

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The Economic Imperative of Expanding College Opportunity—Introduction & Panel 1

June 26, 2013 • Audio

Following remarks by former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin, Caroline Hoxby of Stanford University presented a new proposal that outlines a strategy for targeting and reaching low-income, high-achieving students and providing them with the information necessary to help facilitate their application to selective colleges. William Fitzsimmons of Harvard College, Nicole Farmer Hurd of the National College Advising Corps, and Robert Gordon of The Brookings Institution joined a roundtable discussion on the proposal, moderated by Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone.

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The Economic Imperative of Expanding College Opportunity— Panel 2

June 26, 2013 • Audio

New York Times Washington Bureau Chief David Leonhardt moderated a discussion on the role of higher education in American mobility with Nancy Cantor of Syracuse University, David Coleman of The College Board, Brit Kirwan of the University System of Maryland, and Jon Whitmore of ACT, Inc.

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College Completion

January 15, 2013 • Charts

College education has historically driven increases in labor productivity, which in turn lead to wage growth. This same trend has emerged during the last 40 years. As women’s college-graduation rates jumped over 20 percentage points since 1970 , female workers’ wages increased by similarly high rates. Men’s college-graduation rates, on the other hand, have been relatively flat over this period, and male workers have thus experienced no wage growth in recent decades.

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Return on Investment to a Bachelor’s Degree

January 15, 2013 • Charts

Despite widespread claims that a college degree is no longer worth the rising price of tuition, a bachelor’s degree still has about the same return on investment today as it did in the 80s. College still pays for itself, and then some; it will earn you, on average, a 16 percent return,  which is a higher rate of return than on investments in the stock market (6.8 percent), corporate bonds (2.9 percent), gold (2.3 percent), long-term government bonds (2.2 percent), or housing (0.4 percent).

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Percentage of Population Institutionalized by Education Level, 1970-2010

September 28, 2012 • Charts

Education not only benefits individuals in the form of higher wages: it benefits society by cultivating civic virtues and reducing rates of crime. For instance, the disparity in institutionalization rates among less- and more-educated Americans is astounding. The vast majority of the institutionalized population ages twenty-five to sixty-four are in prison (with the rest in nursing homes), and over the past four decades, the share of Americans without a high school diploma that has been institutionalized has nearly tripled, while the rate for college graduates has remained unchanged.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, Featured Remarks

September 27, 2012 • Video

On September 27th The Hamilton Project at Brookings hosted a forum to discuss new approaches to promoting attainment and achievement in K-12 education. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan delivered featured remarks, highlighting recent progress on education reform, the difficult work still ahead, and the need for innovation to help advance reform efforts.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, Featured Remarks

September 27, 2012 • Audio

On September 27th The Hamilton Project at Brookings hosted a forum to discuss new approaches to promoting attainment and achievement in K-12 education. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan delivered featured remarks, highlighting recent progress on education reform, the difficult work still ahead, and the need for innovation to help advance reform efforts.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Panel 3: “Harnessing Technology to Improve K-12 Education”

September 27, 2012 • Audio

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates roundtable discussion with Associate Professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business Aaron Chatterji, Associate Professor at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management Benjamin Jones, Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District Terry Grier, Director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education Karen Cator, Deputy Director of Policy Development at The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation William Tucker, Founder and CEO of LearnZillion Eric Westendorf, and President of the National Education Association William Tucker.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Panel 2: “Learning from the Successes and Failures of Charter Schools”

September 27, 2012 • Audio

Evercore Partners Founder and Chairman and Chairman of New Visions for Public Schools Roger C. Altman moderates roundtable discussion with Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics at Harvard University and CEO of EdLabs Roland Fryer, Superintendent and Founder of Democracy Prep Public Schools Seth Andrew, Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District Terry Grier, and Research Associate at the Economic Policy Institute and Senior Fellow at the University of California (Berkley) School of Law’s Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy Richard Rothstein.
 

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Panel 1: “Staying in School: A Proposal to Raise High School Graduation Rates”

September 27, 2012 • Audio

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates roundtable discussion with Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Toronto Phillip Oreopoulos, Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District Terry Grier, Senior Associate of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Elena Silva, and President of the National Education Association Dennis Van Roekel at the Back to School: Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education event.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Welcome and Introductions

September 27, 2012 • Audio

Robert E. Rubin, Co-Chair of the Council on Foreign Relations and former U.S. Treasury Secretary, gives opening remarks at Back to School: Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Panel 3: “Harnessing Technology to Improve K-12 Education”

September 27, 2012 • Video

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates roundtable discussion with Associate Professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business Aaron Chatterji, Associate Professor at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management Benjamin Jones, Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District Terry Grier, Director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education Karen Cator, Deputy Director of Policy Development at The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation William Tucker, Founder and CEO of LearnZillion Eric Westendorf, and President of the National Education Association William Tucker.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Panel 2: “Learning from the Successes and Failures of Charter Schools”

September 27, 2012 • Video

Evercore Partners Founder and Chairman and Chairman of New Visions for Public Schools Roger C. Altman moderates roundtable discussion with Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics at Harvard University and CEO of EdLabs Roland Fryer, Superintendent and Founder of Democracy Prep Public Schools Seth Andrew, Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District Terry Grier, and Research Associate at the Economic Policy Institute and Senior Fellow at the University of California (Berkley) School of Law’s Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy Richard Rothstein.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Panel 1 “Staying in School: A Proposal to Raise High School Graduation Rates”

September 27, 2012 • Video

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates roundtable discussion with Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Toronto Phillip Oreopoulos, Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District Terry Grier, Senior Associate of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Elena Silva, and President of the National Education Association Dennis Van Roekel at the Back to School: Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education event.

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Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Welcome and Introductions

September 27, 2012 • Video

Robert E. Rubin, Co-Chair of the Council on Foreign Relations and former U.S. Treasury Secretary, gives opening remarks at Back to School: Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education.

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Effects on Student Test Scores at Charter and Traditional Public Schools

September 27, 2012 • Charts

On average, charter schools perform no better than traditional public schools. Some, however, such as those in the Harlem Children’s Zone, have demonstrated a remarkable ability to improve student test scores. Research by Roland Fryer suggests that there are five keys to this success: focusing on human capital, using student data to drive instruction, providing high-dosage tutoring, extending time on task, and fostering a culture of high expectations.

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Improvement in Test Scores after One-Year Intervention

September 27, 2012 • Charts

There is no single solution to the many problems facing America’s education system, but research has shown that many small-scale interventions offer the promise of bettering student outcomes. For instance, incentivizing students to read books has been shown to increase reading comprehension scores. Other interventions include restructuring schools so that they combine elementary- and middle-school grade levels into K-8 schools, starting school later, increasing after-school programs, and reducing class size.

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Black-White Achievement Gap

September 27, 2012 • Charts

While public education is the great equalizer in America, many students arrive at school less prepared and fall further behind during school, resulting in a society where opportunities are not equally shared. For example, the data show a clear achievement gap between black and white students that appears as early as kindergarten and grows with time. Importantly, the disparity cannot be fully explained by observable differences such as income and region. Though a variety of factors combine to create these gaps, there is compelling evidence that variation in school quality is part of the cause.

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Earnings Distribution by Education Level, 2007-2010

September 27, 2012 • Charts

Education is one of the most important determinants of an individual’s earnings potential. For example, while almost 80 percent of high school dropouts made less than $30,000 in 2010, the cutoff for the 80th percentile among college graduates was around $100,000. A college degree is almost a requirement for individuals earning above $100,000 per year: more than 75 percent of them have at least a college degree. In the modern economy, then, having only a high school diploma offers one little chance of breaking into the highest-paying jobs.

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Back to School: Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education - Event Photos

September 27, 2012 • Photo Galleries

On September 27th, The Hamilton Project at Brookings hosted a forum to discuss new approaches to promoting attainment and achievement in K-12 education.  The event included featured remarks by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, highlighting recent progress on education reform, the difficult work still ahead, and the need for innovation to help advance reform efforts. 

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U.S. Immigration Policy - Featured Remarks: The Economic Imperative for Immigration Reform

May 15, 2012 • Video

Cecilia Muñoz, Assistant to the President and Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, gives featured remarks on the Obama Administration’s efforts to reform America’s broken immigration system and why that is an economic imperative.

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Earnings Gains of Displaced Workers in Technical Fields versus Other Fields

November 30, 2011 • Charts

Retraining in technical fields provides higher returns for workers than retraining in non-technical classes.

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Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement Photos

September 27, 2011 • Photo Galleries

On September 27, The Hamilton Project at Brookings helda forum to highlight new policy ideas and perspectives on how to improve student performance in K-12 education.  The program concluded with a discussion on the path forward in education reform with Teach for America Founder and CEO Wendy Kopp and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, moderated by David Leonhardt, D.C. bureau chief of the New York Times.

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Promoting K-12 Education: Introduction and Panel I: The Power and Pitfalls of Education Incentives

September 27, 2011 • Audio

Hamilton Project Advisory Council member Robert E. Rubin welcomes the crowd at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement," and Advisory Council member Roger C. Altman provides an overview of a new strategy paper. Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates a panel discussion between Harvard University Professor and EdLabs CEO Roland Fryer, former Superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Peter Gorman, New Visions for Public Schools President Robert L. Hughes, and United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew.

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Promoting K-12 Education: Roundtable Discussion: Lessons Learned from Education Reform and the Path Forward

September 27, 2011 • Audio

New York Times D.C. Bureau Chief David Leonhardt moderates a conversation between Teach for America Founder and CEO Wendy Kopp and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement."

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Promoting K-12 Education: Panel III: New Assessments for Improved Accountability

September 27, 2011 • Audio

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates a panel discussion between University of Chicago Professor Derek Neal, former Superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Peter Gorman, New Visions for Public Schools President Robert L. Hughes, and United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement."

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Promoting K-12 Education: Panel II: Organizing Schools to Improve Student Achievement: Start Times, Grade Configurations, and Teacher Assignments

September 27, 2011 • Audio

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates a panel discussion between University of Michigan Professor Brian A. Jacob, Columbia University Professor Jonah E. Rockoff, former Superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Peter Gorman, New Visions for Public Schools President Robert L. Hughes, and United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement."

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Promoting K-12 Education: Roundtable Discussion: Lessons Learned from Education Reform and the Path Forward

September 27, 2011 • Video

New York Times D.C. Bureau Chief David Leonhardt moderates a conversation between Teach for America Founder and CEO Wendy Kopp and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement."

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Promoting K-12 Education: Panel III: New Assessments for Improved Accountability

September 27, 2011 • Video

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates a panel discussion between University of Chicago Professor Derek Neal, former Superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Peter Gorman, New Visions for Public Schools President Robert L. Hughes, and United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement."

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Promoting K-12 Education: Panel II: Organizing Schools to Improve Student Achievement: Start Times, Grade Configurations, and Teacher Assignments

September 27, 2011 • Video

Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates a panel discussion between University of Michigan Professor Brian A. Jacob, Columbia University Professor Jonah E. Rockoff, former Superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Peter Gorman, New Visions for Public Schools President Robert L. Hughes, and United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement."

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Impact of Incentive Programs on Student Achievement

September 27, 2011 • Charts

Students are more likely to respond to education incentives for certain inputs, such as reading books, than more general outputs, such as making good grades.

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Annual Earnings of Teachers and Non-Teachers

September 27, 2011 • Charts

Over the last 40 years, the salary gap between teachers and nonteachers has grown by over $10,000.

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Average Mathematics Test Scores for 17-Year-Old White and Black Students

September 27, 2011 • Charts

Investments in education have narrowed the black-white skill gap for much of the twentieth century, but has stagnated since the 1980s.

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Average Mathematics Test Scores for 15-Year-Olds, OECD Countries

September 27, 2011 • Charts

The United States scores below the OCED average in mathematics, despite spending $3,000 more per student than the OCED average.

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Average Math and Reading Test Scores for 17 Year Olds

September 27, 2011 • Charts

Over the last 30 years, math and reading test scores for high school seniors have barely moved.

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Promoting K-12 Education: Introduction and Panel I: The Power and Pitfalls of Education Incentives

September 27, 2011 • Video

Hamilton Project Advisory Council member Robert E. Rubin welcomes the crowd at the event "Promoting K-12 Education to Advance Student Achievement," and Advisory Council member Roger C. Altman provides an overview of a new strategy paper. Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone moderates a panel discussion between Harvard University Professor and EdLabs CEO Roland Fryer, former Superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Peter Gorman, New Visions for Public Schools President Robert L. Hughes, and United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew.

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Rate of Return of College Compared to Alternative Investments

June 25, 2011 • Charts

Despite continued debate over the value of a college education, data shows that higher education has a much higher rate of return than any other investment.

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Earnings by Education Level

June 3, 2011 • Charts

In today’s economy, those young adults with a college degree are more likely to be employed and earn higher wages than their peers with a high school diploma only or less.

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High School and College Completion and Spending per Pupil

February 25, 2011 • Charts

Despite increases in per-student education spending, high school and college completion rates have stagnated over the past 30 years.

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Unemployed and Underemployed Workers by Education Level

February 4, 2011 • Charts

In addition to the 14 million Americans officially counted as unemployed, there are over 11 million American workers who are underutilized, underemployed, or have given up seeking work.

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The Rising Cost of College

December 3, 2010 • Charts

College tuition and fees have risen dramatically during the last 30 years for public and private U.S. institutions and are projected to continue increasing.

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Changes in College Completion Over Time Across Countries

December 3, 2010 • Charts

In the 1970s and 1980s, the United States led the world in the share of the population that completed a college degree; by 2008 that lead had essentially vanished.

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Mobility by Education Level

October 13, 2010 • Charts

In communities with large numbers of displaced workers, more-educated workers are more likely to move to a new city of country in search of employment than less-educated workers. 

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Changes in Real Hourly Earnings by Education

April 30, 2010 • Charts

Over the past three decades, the wages of college graduates — both men and women — have increased significantly more than the wages of less educated workers.

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The Role of Education in Promoting Opportunity and Economic Growth: Panel One

March 29, 2007 • Audio

Full audio of Panel One from the event The Role of Education in Promoting Opportunity and Economic Growth

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The Role of Education in Promoting Opportunity and Economic Growth: Panel Two

March 29, 2007 • Audio

Full audio of Panel Two from the event The Role of Education in Promoting Opportunity and Economic Growth

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Summer Gains by Socioeconomic Status — Reading Comprehension

April 7, 2006 • Charts

A study on Baltimore public schools shows that socio-economic status impacts academic achievement during the summer months.

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