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Evolution of the “Jobs Gap” and Possible Scenarios for Growth

Any replication of this chart should be credited to The Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution.

Evolution of the “Jobs Gap” and Possible Scenarios for Growth

Each month, The Hamilton Project calculates America’s “jobs gap,” or the number of jobs that the U.S. economy needs to create in order to return to pre-recession employment levels while absorbing the 125,000 people who enter the labor force each month. As of the end of March 2014, our nation faces a jobs gap of 7.4 million jobs. This chart shows how the jobs gap has evolved since the start of the Great Recession in December 2007, and how long it will take to close under different assumptions for job growth. If the economy adds about 208,000 jobs per month, which was the average monthly rate for the best year of job creation in the 2000s, then it will take until September 2018 to close the jobs gap. Given a more optimistic rate of 321,000 jobs per month, which was the average monthly rate of the best year of job creation in the 1990s, the economy will reach pre-recession employment levels by September 2016.


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Evolution of the “Jobs Gap” and Possible Scenarios for Growth

April 4, 2014 • Charts

The Hamilton Project tracks the monthly “jobs gap,” which is the number of jobs that need to be created in order to return to pre-recession employment levels while still absorbing the workers entering the labor force each month.

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State-by-State “Jobs Gap”

April 3, 2014 • Charts

Every month, The Hamilton Project tracks the “jobs gap,” which is the number of jobs that need to be created in order to return to pre-recession employment levels while still absorbing the workers entering the labor force each month. Here, the Project compares changes in employment levels since the onset of the Great Recession across states.

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Wireless Spectrum and the Future of Technology Innovation - Event Photos

March 24, 2014 • Photo Galleries

On March 24th, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum and released a new policy proposal addressing the key challenges of regulating wireless spectrum during a time of rapid change and increasing demand. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Roger Altman opened the forum, and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Thomas Wheeler gave keynote remarks.

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Wireless Spectrum and the Future of Technology Innovation - Introduction & Framing Remarks Audio

March 24, 2014 • Audio

On March 24th, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum and released a new policy proposal addressing key challenges with the allocation and regulation of wireless spectrum during a time of rapid change and increasing demand. Former U.S. Secretary Treasury Roger Altman opened the forum and introduced the panel. Hamilton Project director Melissa Kearney delivered framing remarks on the economic challenge of more-efficient assignment of wireless spectrum.

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Wireless Spectrum and the Future of Technology Innovation - Roundtable Discussion Audio

March 24, 2014 • Audio

On March 24th, The Hamilton Project hosted a forum addressing key challenges with the allocation and regulation of wireless spectrum during a time of rapid change and increasing demand. A new policy proposal was presented by authors Pierre de Vries, Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Spectrum Policy Initiative at the Silicon Flatirons Center and Phil Weiser, Dean and Thomson Professor at the University of Colorado Law School and Executive Director and Founder of the Silicon Flatirons Center. The authors were joined by discussants Dean Brenner, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs at Qualcomm; Joan Marsh, Vice President, Federal Regulatory Affairs from AT&T; and Preston Marshall, Wireless Networking at Google. The roundtable was moderated by Blair Levin, Communications & Society Fellow at The Aspen Institute.

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