Papers: Energy & Environment

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Tomorrow’s Catch: A Proposal to Strengthen the Economic Sustainability of U.S. Fisheries

September 2014 • Christopher CostelloEconomic Security, Effective Government, Energy & Environment, State & Local

In this Hamilton Project discussion paper, Christopher Costello of the University of California, Santa Barbara proposes that certain fisheries conduct an analysis of alternative fishery management structures, including different forms of catch shares, to improve the economic value of U.S. fisheries.

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What’s the Catch? Challenges and Opportunities of the U.S. Fishing Industry

September 2014 • Melissa S. Kearney, Benjamin H. Harris, Brad HershbeinEconomic Security, Effective Government, Energy & Environment, State & Local

In this policy memo, The Hamilton Project highlights the economic significance of U.S. fisheries, describes the current landscape of the industry and typical management practices, and explains the “tragedy of the commons” challenge facing this natural resource. The Project also explores possible approaches for improving the economic and ecological sustainability of U.S. fisheries by establishing better-defined property rights as an alternative to traditional management systems.
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The Hamilton Project Policy Response to the 2014 State of the Union Address

January 2014 • Economic Security, Education, Effective Government, Employment & Wages, Energy & Environment, Global Economy, Infrastructure, Poverty, State & Local, Tax Policy, Technology & Innovation

In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama spoke of a “breakthrough year for America” and foreshadowed a “year of action.” He focused on ways to expand opportunities for Americans by enhancing employment and education options for low-and middle-income citizens, developing more robust worker training programs, investing in America through infrastructure investments and energy innovation, the importance of making progress on immigration reform, and more. Since its launch in 2006, The Hamilton Project has released a range of targeted policy proposals that provide innovative, evidence-based approaches to addressing many of the policy priorities set forth in the Presidents address.

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Reforming Federal Support for Risky Development

February 2013 • David R. Conrad, Edward A. ThomasEffective Government, Infrastructure, Energy & Environment

David Conrad and Ed Thomas explore how the National Flood Insurance Program and other federal disaster relief programs could be reformed to better align the costs and benefits of living in disaster-prone areas and help put the budget on more sound footing. This proposal aims to reduce budget costs of natural disasters and reduce risk to life and property of Americans living in disaster-prone areas.

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The Many Benefits of a Carbon Tax

February 2013 • Adele MorrisTax Policy, Energy & Environment

Adele Morris proposes a carbon tax as a new source of revenue that could also help address climate change. She suggests that a carbon tax would reduce the buildup of greenhouse gasses, replace command-and-control regulations and expensive subsidies with transparent and powerful market-based incentives, and promote economic activity through reduced regulatory burden and lower marginal tax rates.

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Eliminating Fossil Fuel Subsidies

February 2013 • Joseph E. AldyTax Policy, Energy & Environment

Limiting subsidies for fossil fuels could raise revenue for the federal government while also benefiting the environment. Joseph Aldy proposes eliminating twelve subsidies to help level the playing field among fossil fuel producers relative to other businesses, and lead to potentially lower global fuel prices by providing the United States with increased leverage in negotiations over eliminating fossil fuel subsides in the developing world.

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The Hamilton Project Policy Response to the State of the Union Address

February 2013 • Economic Security, Education, Effective Government, Employment & Wages, Energy & Environment, Global Economy, Health Care, Infrastructure, Poverty, State & Local, Tax Policy, Technology & Innovation

In his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama outlined an ambitious second-term agenda focusing on policies to help strengthen America’s middle class through broad-based economic growth. Since its launch in 2006, The Hamilton Project has released a range of targeted policy proposals that provide innovative, evidence-based approaches to address many of the priorities set forth in this year’s address, which we offer as a resource to policymakers in response to specific ideas mentioned by the President this week.

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Modernizing Bonding Requirements for Natural Gas Producers

June 2012 • Lucas DavisEffective Government, Energy & Environment

To ensure funds are available for clean-up when natural gas accidents occur, Lucas Davis of UC Berkeley explores new approaches to bonding requirements for producers, including increasing federal minimum bond amounts and encouraging states to adopt similar minimum bond amounts for drilling on non-federal land.

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Leveling the Playing Field for Natural Gas in Transportation

June 2012 • Christopher R. KnittelInfrastructure, Energy & Environment

Domestic natural gas is both cleaner and more affordable than oil, making it an attractive and practical alternative. In a new Hamilton Project paper, Christopher R. Knittel of MIT proposes a series of steps to promote natural gas in transportation.

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A Strategy for U.S. Natural Gas Exports

June 2012 • Michael LeviGlobal Economy, Energy & Environment

Michael Levi of the Council on Foreign Relations poses a framework for regulators to determine if exporting natural gas is in the public interest, arguing the upsides of exports outweigh the costs as long as the government acts to mitigate risk.

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Energy Policy Opportunities and Continuing Challenges in the Presence of Increased Supplies of Natural Gas and Petroleum

June 2012 • Michael Greenstone, Adam LooneyEmployment & Wages, Energy & Environment

A new Hamilton Project framing memo summarizes recent changes in the energy sector, and lays out five principles for shaping energy and environmental policy. 

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The Role of Oil and Gas in Driving Job Growth

June 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael GreenstoneEnergy & Environment, Employment & Wages, Economic Security

The Hamilton Project explores what increased domestic natural gas and oil production means for the American energy sector, the environment, and employment.

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Paying Too Much for Energy? The True Costs of Our Energy Choices

April 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael GreenstoneEnergy & Environment

In the Spring issue of Daedalus, Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney draw from previous Hamilton Project research to examine the “true social cost” of current energy consumption - nearly three times the amount that appears on utility bills.

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The Hamilton Project Policy Response to the State of the Union Address

January 2012 • Education, Economic Security, Employment & Wages, Energy & Environment, Infrastructure, Tax Policy, Technology & Innovation

Last night, President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address, putting forth his policy agenda to the 112th Congress on issues. Since its launch in 2006, The Hamilton Project has developed targeted policy proposals that touch on many of these areas, which we offer as a resource to policymakers in response to specific ideas mentioned by the President last evening. 

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A Better Approach to Environmental Regulation: Getting the Costs and Benefits Right

May 2011 • Ted GayerEnergy & Environment, Effective Government

Ted Gayer proposes three reforms addressing several problems that undermine the role played by cost-benefit analysis in environmental regulation: 1) agencies should use a check list of good empirical practices for using cost-benefit analysis; 2) regulators should presume that consumers can make their own energy-saving decisions and focus on regulations addressing harm people impose on others; and 3) a six-month, early regulatory review process should be established for particularly important regulations.

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An Energy Technology Corporation Will Improve the Federal Government’s Efforts to Accelerate Energy Innovation

May 2011 • John M. DeutchEnergy & Environment, Technology & Innovation

John M. Deutch proposes a series of best practices for government support of U.S. technology demonstration and a new institution, the Energy Technology Corporation, that would be responsible for managing and selecting technology demonstration projects.

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Promoting Clean Energy in the American Power Sector

May 2011 • Joseph E. AldyEnergy & Environment

Joseph E. Aldy proposes a national clean energy standard that would lower carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 60 percent relative to 2005 levels over twenty years, streamline the fragmented regulatory system that is currently in place, generate fiscal benefits, and help fund energy innovation.

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A Strategy for America’s Energy Future: Illuminating Energy’s Full Costs

May 2011 • Adam Looney, Michael GreenstoneEnergy & Environment, Effective Government

America’s energy choices are built on the prices we see at the pump and our utility bills. Yet these prices mask the social costs arising from those energy choices, including shorter lives, higher health care expenses, a changing climate, and weakened national security. Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney provide four principles for reforming America’s energy policies to help level the playing field for all energy sources — moving away from a system that favors energy sources with lower prices at the pump but higher costs to society through health impacts and our ongoing reliance on foreign oil.

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We Are What We Breathe: The Impacts of Air Pollution on Employment and Productivity

May 2011 • Adam Looney, Michael GreenstoneEnergy & Environment, Employment & Wages

Despite modest improvement in April jobs numbers, the job gap — the number of U.S. jobs that must be created to return to pre-recession levels — is just under 12 million. Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney also explore the impact of air pollution on long-term employment and the productivity of American workers.

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A U.S. Innovation Strategy for Climate Change Mitigation

December 2008 • Richard G. NewellEnergy & Environment, Technology & Innovation

Two market problems in addressing climate change are lack of private incentive to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and underinvestment by industry in R&D. This proposal addresses these issues through permanent R&D tax credits and support for research institutions. 
 

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A U.S. Cap-and-Trade System to Address Global Climate Change

October 2007 • Robert N. StavinsEnergy & Environment, Global Economy

This paper lays out the arguments for using cap-and-trade to address climate change and proposes a system that includes an upstream cap on CO2, a gradual downward trajectory of emissions ceilings over time, and mechanisms to reduce cost uncertainty.

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An Equitable Tax Reform to Address Global Climate Change

October 2007 • Gilbert E. MetcalfEnergy & Environment, Tax Policy

This paper describes a carbon tax swap that is revenue and distributionally neutral. The tax swap levies a tax on greenhouse gas emissions with revenue being used to fund a reduction in the income tax, tied to earned income.

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An Economic Strategy to Address Climate Change and Promote Energy Security

October 2007 • Jason Furman, Jason E. BordoffEnergy & Environment, Global Economy

This paper presents a strategy for addressing climate change and promoting energy security that includes pricing carbon and oil, investing in basic research on energy technologies, and engaging with other major emitting nations.

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