State & Local

{image_title}

State and local governments are under tremendous pressure to provide immediate services for their residents while also making long-term investments in education, health care, and infrastructure. In fact, roughly 91 percent of K-12 spending and more than 70 percent of public infrastructure spending is done by state and local governments. The Hamilton Project offers innovative policies to help states prioritize spending, make economically sound investments, and implement much-needed changes to help America remain competitive in an increasingly global economy.


Related to State & Local

{image_title}

The Hamilton Project Policy Response to the 2014 State of the Union Address

Papers • January 2014

In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama spoke of a “breakthrough year for America” and foreshadowed a “year of action.” He focused on ways to expand opportunities for Americans by enhancing employment and education options for low-and middle-income citizens, developing more robust worker training programs, investing in America through infrastructure investments and energy innovation, the importance of making progress on immigration reform, and more. Since its launch in 2006, The Hamilton Project has released a range of targeted policy proposals that provide innovative, evidence-based approaches to addressing many of the policy priorities set forth in the Presidents address.

{image_title}

Strengthening SNAP for a More Food-Secure, Healthy America

Papers • December 2013 • Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—formerly known as the Food Stamp Program—is an essential part of America’s social safety net. In a new Hamilton Project discussion paper, Diane Schanzenbach proposes five reforms that could strengthen SNAP, including incentives for participants to purchase healthier foods and improvements to the benefit formula.

{image_title}

New Approaches to Promoting College Access for More Americans

Papers • June 2013 • Michael Greenstone, Adam Looney

The role of education in improving social mobility is well-known, and new evidence identifies promising ways to help more low-income students improve their educational opportunities. In a new blog post, The Hamilton Project compares a range of interventions aimed at boosting college attendance and completion among low-income students.

{image_title}

Using Data to Improve the Performance of Workforce Training

Papers • April 2013 • Louis S. Jacobson, Robert J. LaLonde

Workforce training programs have the potential to improve the lives and incomes of millions of Americans by lifting many into the middle class and preventing others from falling out of it. Despite their promise, however, too many workers enroll in courses that they do not complete or complete courses that do not lead to better jobs, reducing the benefits to workers and the economic return to workforce investments. Louis Jacobson of New Horizons Economic Research and Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago propose a competition to increase the return on training investments by developing the data and measures necessary to provide the information prospective trainees need, by presenting the information in user-friendly “report cards,” by providing help for prospective trainees to use the information effectively, and by creating incentives for states to implement permanent information systems once they prove cost-effective.

{image_title}

Building on Recent Advances in Evidence-Based Policymaking

Papers • April 2013 • Jeffrey B. Liebman

Over the past decade, and particularly over the past five years, new government strategies have begun to emerge—at the federal, state, and local levels—that offer the potential of simultaneously making better use of taxpayer dollars and speeding up progress in addressing serious social problems. Jeffrey Liebman of Harvard University discusses several of these strategies and outlines five steps that policymakers can take to better inform their work with evidence. He also proposes a grant competition that identifies and encourages innovation in ten social policy priority areas as well as federal support for state and local Pay for Success initiatives.

{image_title}

Funding Transportation Infrastructure with User Fees

Papers • February 2013 • Jack Basso, Tyler Duvall

Investments in infrastructure are essential for a vital economy. Tyler Duvall and Jack Basso suggest looking to user fees as a way to raise revenues, reduce congestion on major roadways, reduce pollution, and promote wiser infrastructure investments.

{image_title}

The Hamilton Project Policy Response to the State of the Union Address

Papers • February 2013

In his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama outlined an ambitious second-term agenda focusing on policies to help strengthen America’s middle class through broad-based economic growth. Since its launch in 2006, The Hamilton Project has released a range of targeted policy proposals that provide innovative, evidence-based approaches to address many of the priorities set forth in this year’s address, which we offer as a resource to policymakers in response to specific ideas mentioned by the President this week.

{image_title}

Regardless of the Cost, College Still Matters

Papers • October 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael Greenstone

There is ongoing debate about the rising cost of college and whether that investment is still worthwhile in today’s economy. In this month’s employment analysis, The Hamilton Project examines the rising cost of college over the last 30 years and finds that while college costs are growing, the increase in earnings one receives from a college degree—and, by extension, the cost of not going to college—are growing even faster. 

{image_title}

A Record Decline in Government Jobs: Implications for the Economy and America’s Workforce

Papers • August 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael Greenstone

The Hamilton Project examines the short- and long-run impacts of public-sector job cuts since the Great Recession. If the share of government employment to population had remained at historical levels, the unemployment rate would be approximately 7.1 percent.

{image_title}

The Role of Fiscal Stimulus in the Ongoing Recovery

Papers • July 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael Greenstone

The Hamilton Project examines the relationship between government spending and unemployment, finding that states that spent more during the Great Recession experienced a smaller increase in their unemployment rate.

charts Icon

State-by-State “Jobs Gap”

April 3, 2014 • Charts

Every month, The Hamilton Project tracks the “jobs gap,” which is the number of jobs that need to be created in order to return to pre-recession employment levels while still absorbing the workers entering the labor force each month. Here, the Project compares changes in employment levels since the onset of the Great Recession across states.

charts Icon

Public Water and Transportation Spending by State and Local Governments

February 25, 2011 • Charts

State and local governments provide most of the funding for critical infrastructure systems, but spending has declined over the last 50 years.

charts Icon

Change in Employment-to-Population Ratio Following 1980 Recession

October 13, 2010 • Charts

Employment gaps created during the 1980-1982 recessions still remain today.

charts Icon

Comparing the Hardest Hit Counties in the 1980-1982 Recessions and the 2007-2009 Recessions

October 13, 2010 • Charts

The hardest hit counties in the 1980-1982 recessions differed dramatically from the hardest hit counties in the Great Recession from 2007-2009. 

charts Icon

Income Per Capita in Hardest-Hit Counties During the 1980-1982 Recessions

October 13, 2010 • Charts

The hardest hit counties during the 1980-1982 recessions experienced sharper per-capita income declines during the recessions, as well as slower growth following the national recovery. 

{image_title}

Policies for Tackling the Mortgage Mess

April 10, 2008 • Douglas W. Elmendorf

Hamilton Project scholar Doug Elmendorf testified before the Senate Banking Committee on possible policies for tackling the mortgage mess.

{image_title}

The Economic and Social Effects of Crime and Mass Incarceration in the United States

May 1, 2014 • Washington, DC

On May 1st, The Hamilton Project at Brookings will host a forum and release three new papers focusing on crime and incarceration in the United States. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin will deliver opening remarks, and Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) will join the forum to discuss the Smarter Sentencing Act of 2014, which was recently passed by the Senate Judiciary Committee with bi-partisan support.

{image_title}

Back to School:  Promoting Attainment and Achievement in K-12 Education

September 27, 2012 • Washington, DC

On September 27th, The Hamilton Project at Brookings hosted a forum to discuss new approaches to promoting attainment and achievement in K-12 education.  The event included featured remarks by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, highlighting recent progress on education reform, the difficult work still ahead, and the need for innovation to help advance reform efforts. 

{image_title}

The Future of Housing and Credit Markets

September 23, 2008 • Washington, DC

The Project released new discussion papers and hosted panel discussions on housing and credit markets.  The first panel explored ways to reform low-income housing assistance, while the second focused on innovative mortgage ideas to help protect consumers.

{image_title}

Missing Markets: Fostering Market-Based Solutions to Major Risks

June 5, 2008 • Washington, DC

The Hamilton Project hosted a discussion on what the government can do to foster market-based solutions to major risks.  Markets that could potentially mitigate or reduce some of the biggest risks faced by the American people and their broader communities are nonexistent or underutilized.

{image_title}

Addressing the Foreclosure Crisis: A Hamilton Project Policy Discussion

March 14, 2008 • Washington, DC

The Hamilton Project hosted a conversation on proposed policy responses to the mortgage-foreclosure problem. Many Americans now owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth; however, which policies provide the most effective remedy to the problem remains unanswered.

charts Icon

State-by-State “Jobs Gap”

April 3, 2014 • Charts

Every month, The Hamilton Project tracks the “jobs gap,” which is the number of jobs that need to be created in order to return to pre-recession employment levels while still absorbing the workers entering the labor force each month. Here, the Project compares changes in employment levels since the onset of the Great Recession across states.

video Icon

Supporting America’s Lower-Middle-Class: Panel 2

December 5, 2013 • Video

On Dec. 4th The Hamilton Project hosted a forum to discuss policies to support the struggling lower-middle-class. In the second panel, Joel Berg, Executive Director of the NYC Coalition Against Hunger; James Ziliak, Director of the Center for Poverty Research at the University of Kentucky; and Robert Greenstein, President of the Center on Budget & Policy Priorities, joined Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach of Northwestern University to discuss her proposal to strengthen the food stamp (SNAP) program.

photo_galleries Icon

Investing in What Works: The Importance of Evidence-Based Policymaking—Photo Gallery

April 19, 2013 • Photo Galleries

On April 17th, The Hamilton Project at Brookings and Results for America, an initiative of America Achieves, co-hosted a forum and release two new papers on the important role of evidence in policymaking. U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), U.S. Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), Alan Krueger, Chair of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, and other distinguished experts participated in roundtable discussions on the proposals and how evidence-based policymaking can improve the effectiveness of federally funded programs.
 

video Icon

Investing in What Works: The Importance of Evidence-Based Policymaking—Introduction & Panel 1

April 18, 2013 • Video

Founder & Chairman of Evercore Partners Roger Altman provided welcoming remarks to kick off this forum co-hosted by The Hamilton Project and Results for America. In the first panel discussion, Jeffrey Liebman of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and Louis Jacobson of New Horizons Economic Research presented new proposals on the crucial role of evidence and results in policymaking. The authors were joined by former White House Domestic Policy Council Director John Bridgeland, New York City Deputy Mayor Linda Gibbs, Results for America Managing Director Michele Jolin and Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone for a discussion of the new papers.

video Icon

Investing in What Works: The Importance of Evidence-Based Policymaking—Panel 2

April 18, 2013 • Video

U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), U.S. Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), and Alan Krueger, Chair of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, joined former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin for a roundtable discussion on the importance of harnessing evidence to improve the effectiveness of federally funded programs.

audio Icon

Investing in What Works: The Importance of Evidence-Based Policymaking—Introduction & Panel 1: Opportunities for Bringing Evidence to Policymaking

April 18, 2013 • Audio

Founder & Chairman of Evercore Partners Roger Altman provided welcoming remarks to kick off this forum co-hosted by The Hamilton Project and Results for America. In the first panel discussion, Jeffrey Liebman of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and Louis Jacobson of New Horizons Economic Research presented new proposals on the crucial role of evidence and results in policymaking. The authors were joined by former White House Domestic Policy Council Director John Bridgeland, New York City Deputy Mayor Linda Gibbs, Results for America Managing Director Michele Jolin and Hamilton Project Director Michael Greenstone for a discussion of the new papers.

audio Icon

Investing in What Works: The Importance of Evidence-Based Policymaking—Panel 2: Using Evidence To Drive Public Dollars Toward What Works

April 18, 2013 • Audio

U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), U.S. Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), and Alan Krueger, Chair of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, joined former U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin for a roundtable discussion on the importance of harnessing evidence to improve the effectiveness of federally funded programs.

audio Icon

State Roads to Economic Recovery: Panel 2: Tools for Efficient State Investment

February 25, 2011 • Audio

Full audio of Panel 2: "Tools for Efficient State Investment" from the event State Roads to Economic Recovery: Policies, Pavements, and Partnerships.
 

audio Icon

State Roads to Economic Recovery: Panel 1: Building the Next Economy in Today’s Fiscal Climate

February 25, 2011 • Audio

Full audio of Panel 1: "Building the Next Economy in Today’s Fiscal Climate" from the event State Roads to Economic Recovery: Policies, Pavements, and Partnerships.
 

charts Icon

Public Water and Transportation Spending by State and Local Governments

February 25, 2011 • Charts

State and local governments provide most of the funding for critical infrastructure systems, but spending has declined over the last 50 years.

Hamilton Project Updates

A periodic newsletter of events, policy briefs, and working papers from The Hamilton Project.