You have JavaScript turned off! Javascript is required for the best experience on this site.

All News

News Coverage Sep 16, 2016

Michigan Live: Is college still worth the cost? Usually

“A 2014 [Hamliton Project] national study of lifetime earnings in 80 college majors found that median earnings by college graduates are higher in every major over lifetime earnings of those with a high school degree. But there were a handful of majors that earned less than the median earnings of those with an associate degree -- and not much more than a high school graduate. They include drama and theater arts, elementary education, early childhood education and theology.”

News Coverage Sep 15, 2016

KJZZ: Charter Schools Fight Back Against Comedian John Oliver

“The Arizona State Board for Charter Schools has approved an intent to revoke the charter of a Mesa school that closed just as school was supposed to start. And recently, charter schools caught the eye of John Oliver, on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight. In response to the monologue, the Center for Education Reform launched what it’s calling the “Hey John Oliver, back off my charter school” video contest, which aims to show how charter schools help students and their families. Diane Schanzenbach is the director of the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution – it’s a non-partisan economic think tank that looks at a variety of policies, including education. We ask if she thinks charter schools suffer a perception problem.”

News Coverage Sep 15, 2016

WUOM: What is the average class size in Michigan’s schools?

"Michigan Radio's Jennifer Guerra spoke with Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach. She says small classes help students. They're particularly helpful through grade 3, and large class sizes can harm students as they get older. "Kids who were randomly assigned to the small classes were more likely to go on to attend college," explains Schanzenbach. "They’re less likely to be involved in crime, they’re less likely to be a teenage parent, they’re more likely to save for retirement." And the positive outcomes are most pronounced in African American children and kids from low-income families."

News Coverage Sep 8, 2016

PBS NewsHour: Could a Hillary Clinton presidency spark a preschool evolution?

“Among other findings, the study found Head Start children had a higher high school graduation rate, by 5 percentage points, than their non-Head Start siblings. “Third-grade test scores are only one thing that we care about,” said Diane Schanzenbach, director of the Hamilton Project at The Brookings Institute, the think tank that conducted the recent study. “We care more about the long-term impact on young kids.”

News Coverage Sep 2, 2016

NewAmerica.org: Head Start Works. And It’s About to Get Even Better.

“The second study comes from the Hamilton Project at Brookings.  Their new economic analysis extends what we know about the long-term impacts of Head Start even beyond middle school. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a survey that has tracked a multi-generational representative sample since 1979, the study compares Head Start children with their siblings who either went to a different type of pre-K or who did not attend any program.” 

News Coverage Aug 31, 2016

Mackinac Center: Detroit Should Lessen Licensing Requirements

“For at least 60 occupations, workers must pay fees, take classes, pass exams, and/or undergo additional training prior to being allowed to work. Research shows that these barriers restrict job growth and provide no measurable health or safety benefits to the public. Morris Kleiner of the University of Minnesota concludes in a 2015 Brookings Institution [Hamilton Project] paper that licensing requirements cost consumers more than $200 billion and result in up to 2.85 million fewer jobs. As the economic damage becomes more clear, Mr. Kleiner has found allies in groups as ideologically distinct as the Cato Institute and President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.”

News Coverage Aug 29, 2016

Pacific Standard Magazine: What Are the Long-Term Effects of Head Start?

“Earlier this month, the Hamilton Project’s Lauren Bauer and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach released a study on the long-term effects of childhood participation in Head Start, a large, federally funded early childhood education program. Their results resoundingly support Heckman’s arguments. Previous evaluations of the short-term impacts of Head Start have echoed the Tennessee evaluation — short-term boosts in test scores that “fade out” once children finish the program. Longer-term evaluations, meanwhile, have found modest effects of Head Start participation on high school graduation rates and the likelihood that participants will attempt post-secondary education, but haven’t analyzed the effects of the program on participants past the age of 28.”

News Coverage Aug 26, 2016

CBS Money Watch: For these rising costs, the middle class has it the worst

“Middle-class families have been especially hurt since the recession, with their spending on health care jumping 25 percent from 2007 to 2014, according to The Wall Street Journal, citing an analysis from Brookings Institution senior fellow Diane Schanzenbach. At the same time, income for middle-class Americans has slipped, falling from almost $77,000 in 2000 to slightly more than $73,000 in 2014. The result: financial heartburn that no medication is likely to cure.”

News Coverage Aug 26, 2016

Becker’s Hospital Review: The middle class’ dominant role in healthcare spending

“The Wall Street Journal cites a June Brookings Institution study, which found middle-income households now allocate the biggest portion of their spending to healthcare, 8.9 percent, a rise of more than three percentage points from 1984 to 2014. Additionally, an analysis for The Wall Street Journal by Brookings senior fellow Diane Schanzenbach found that by 2014, middle-income households spent 25 percent more on healthcare than what they were spending before the recession that began in 2007, the article states. This happened even as spending fell for food, housing, clothing and transportation.”

News Coverage Aug 26, 2016

Wall Street Journal: How Detroit Can Liberate Its ‘Extreme Rebels’

“Research shows that these barriers restrict job growth and provide no measurable health or safety benefits to the public. Morris Kleiner of the University of Minnesota concludes in a 2015 Brookings Institution [Hamilton Project] paper that licensing requirements cost consumers more than $200 billion and result in up to 2.85 million fewer jobs. As the economic damage becomes more clear, Mr. Kleiner has found allies in groups as ideologically distinct as the Cato Institute and PresidentObama’s Council of Economic Advisers.”

News Coverage Aug 25, 2016

The Wall Street Journal: Burden of Health-Care Costs Moves to the Middle Class

“A June [Hamilton Project at] Brookings Institution study found middle-income households now devote the largest share of their spending to health care, 8.9%, a rise of more than three percentage points from 1984 to 2014. By 2014, middle-income households’ health-care spending was 25% higher than what they were spending before the recession that began in 2007, even as spending fell for other “basic needs” such as food, housing, clothing and transportation, according to an analysis for The Wall Street Journal by Brookings senior fellow Diane Schanzenbach. These households cut back sharply on more discretionary categories like dining out and clothing.

News Coverage Jan 29, 2016

Time Tracking Blog: You Don’y Have to be a Geek to Make it Big in the Gig Economy

“At the lower end, a report published in December 2015 by The Hamilton Project estimates that just 600,000 people in the U.S. (equivalent to 0.4 percent of the total workforce) currently work in the gig economy. This figure is much smaller than other estimates and while some may use it as evidence that the gig economy is simply “Silicon Valley Hype”, the report maintains that these workers still represent a significant and growing minority who not only warrant our attention but greater protection.”

News Coverage Jan 27, 2016

JD Supra Business Advisor: DOL to Revive Survey to Assess Members of the “Gig” Economy

News Coverage Jan 27, 2016

Project Syndicate: Doing Well by Doing Good

“If you get most of your ideas about government from speeches by America’s Republican presidential candidates, it’s easy to believe that the US federal government is incapable of doing anything right. But not even the Republicans actually believe it. The proof is just beneath the surface, where a remarkable bipartisan consensus is emerging around an approach to America’s most serious social problems – including homelessness, criminal recidivism, preschool education, and chronic illness – that combines the best principles of conservatism and progressivism. It is a strategy that is playing out in Republican states such as Utah and Kentucky and Democratic ones like Massachusetts and California.”