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Economic Facts Apr 26, 2017

Eight Economic Facts on Higher Education

In this set of eight facts, the Hamilton Project offers evidence of the economic value of a postsecondary education. These facts document who is enrolling in and completing – or dropping out of – postsecondary programs and how this has changed over time. While there continues to be a sizeable earnings premium for postsecondary degree holders, these facts also describe the distribution of debt and default among student borrowers.

Event Mar 27, 2017

Identifying Opportunities for Progress on Energy and Climate Policy

Despite an expected shift in energy and environmental priorities in the coming years, several key challenges present clear opportunities for bipartisan cooperation. On March 27, The Hamilton Project and the Energy Policy Institute at University of Chicago (EPIC) co-hosted a forum exploring opportunities for progress on energy and climate policy. The forum included a series of roundtable discussions, with a focus on two Hamilton Project policy proposals on fuel economy regulation and enhancing urban resilience to new climate risk.

Blog Post Mar 24, 2017

The Economic and Policy Context for Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions—and primarily CO2 emissions—have meaningfully contributed to the warming the globe has experienced so far, and are expected to cause a damaging level of warming in coming decades. However, it remains uncertain whether policy makers around the world will be successful in responding to the threat of climate change. In this blog, the authors explore the role of the U.S. as a net carbon dioxide importer and evaluate how policy actions following the 2015 Paris Agreement are expected to mitigate growth in global GHG emissions.

Economic Facts Mar 2, 2017

In Order That They Might Rest Their Arguments on Facts: The Vital Role of Government-Collected Data

Objective, impartial data collection by federal statistical agencies is vital to informing decisions made by businesses, policy makers, and families. These measurements make it possible to have a productive discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of particular policies, and about the state of the economy. These economic facts highlight the breadth and importance of government statistics to public policy and the economy.

Event Mar 2, 2017

The Vital Role of Government Statistics: Strengthening Research, Governance, and Innovation

The modern economy is more reliant on data than ever before. Without reliable information about the economic and social environment, making sensible choices that produce positive outcomes in commerce, research, and governance is impossible. Although the federal government’s statistical agencies play a vital role in generating this information, their value is often overlooked. On March 2, the Hamilton Project at Brookings and the American Enterprise Institute convened a policy luncheon discussion highlighting the important role of government statistics.

Blog Post Feb 9, 2017

No Free Lunch: The Pros and Cons of Public-Private Partnerships for Infrastructure Financing

The need to improve our nation’s infrastructure is an issue on which many policy makers, at all levels of government and across the political aisle, can agree. Regrettably, the consensus essentially begins and ends with the need to address our nation’s infrastructure. In response, an innovative concept for funding and financing infrastructure investment has gained traction in recent years: public-private partnerships. In this blog post, THP assesses the pros and cons of public-private partnerships. 

Event Feb 7, 2017

Identifying a Fiscally Responsible Approach to Funding Infrastructure

The last decade’s decline in productivity—coupled with very low interest rates and declining public investment—presents a challenge and an opportunity for economic policy. In response, many policymakers and experts have proposed investments in public infrastructure, raising questions about which types of infrastructure projects are worth pursuing and how to finance them effectively. On February 7, The Hamilton Project hosted a policy forum exploring fiscally responsible policy options for funding and financing infrastructure investments.

Strategy Paper Oct 28, 2016

Lessons for Broadening School Accountability under the Every Student Succeeds Act

In this strategy paper, The Hamilton Project highlights rates of chronic absenteeism in elementary, middle and high schools throughout the United States. The interactive map illustrates THP’s research that shows that across the nation and in every state, rates of chronic absenteeism meaningfully differentiate between schools. This means that rates of chronic absenteeism are widely distributed across schools and that the lowest performing schools are clearly identifiable. Accordingly, an accompanying Hamilton Project report recommends the selection of chronic absenteeism when states choose a new measure of school accountability as mandated under the recently enacted federal education law.