Featured Papers

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Unlocking Spectrum Value through Improved Allocation, Assignment, and Adjudication of Spectrum Rights

In a new Hamilton Project Discussion Paper, J. Pierre de Vries and Philip J. Weiser propose further reforms to move spectrum regulation away from its “command-and-control” regime to allow for a more-efficient allocation of spectrum resources.  De Vries and Weiser propose three distinct but complementary lines of reform. 


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The Economic Promise of Wireless Spectrum

In a new policy memo, The Hamilton Project highlights four policy challenges hampering the economic potential of wireless spectrum and opportunities to address these challenges through innovative, evidence-driven approaches to reform.


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Hamilton Project Work on Higher Education: Policy Proposals to Promote Access and Affordability

On January 16, President Obama hosted college and university presidents from around the country for a summit to discuss new approaches for promoting college access, with a focus on reaching low-income students. The Hamilton Project has produced significant work highlighting the importance of higher education for economic mobility, in addition to a series of papers by outside experts on improving college access and affordability. A menu of Hamilton Project work on this topic is included for easy reference.


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The “Ripple Effect” of a Minimum Wage Increase on American Workers

In this month’s Hamilton Project employment analysis, we consider the “ripple effects” of a minimum wage increase on near-minimum wage workers, finding that a minimum wage increase could benefit up to 35 million workers.


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The Importance of Unemployment Insurance for American Families & the Economy: Take 2

In the absence of congressional action to extend unemployment insurance, 1.3 million Americans will immediately lose their benefits on December 28th. In this month’s employment analysis, The Hamilton Project reexamines unemployment insurance and highlights evidence suggesting that extended benefits provide a sizable boost for workers and the economy.


Popular Papers

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Unlocking Spectrum Value through Improved Allocation, Assignment, and Adjudication of Spectrum Rights

March 2014 • J. Pierre de Vries, Phil J. WeiserEconomic Security, Effective Government, Infrastructure, Technology & Innovation

In a new Hamilton Project Discussion Paper, J. Pierre de Vries and Philip J. Weiser propose further reforms to move spectrum regulation away from its “command-and-control” regime to allow for a more-efficient allocation of spectrum resources.  De Vries and Weiser propose three distinct but complementary lines of reform. 

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Employment-Based Tax Credits for Low-Skilled Workers

December 2007 • John Karl ScholzEmployment & Wages, Tax Policy

This paper proposes increasing the return to work for low-income families through the expansion the earned income tax credit for low-income childless taxpayers and the creation of a targeted wage subsidy in certain economically depressed areas.

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The Economic Promise of Wireless Spectrum

March 2014 • Benjamin H. Harris, Melissa S. KearneyEconomic Security, Effective Government, Infrastructure, Technology & Innovation

In a new policy memo, The Hamilton Project highlights four policy challenges hampering the economic potential of wireless spectrum and opportunities to address these challenges through innovative, evidence-driven approaches to reform.

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Regardless of the Cost, College Still Matters

October 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael GreenstoneEffective Government, Education, Employment & Wages, State & Local

There is ongoing debate about the rising cost of college and whether that investment is still worthwhile in today’s economy. In this month’s employment analysis, The Hamilton Project examines the rising cost of college over the last 30 years and finds that while college costs are growing, the increase in earnings one receives from a college degree—and, by extension, the cost of not going to college—are growing even faster. 

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The Truth about Taxes: Just About Everyone Pays Them

April 2012 • Adam Looney, Michael GreenstoneEmployment & Wages, Tax Policy

A popular tax myth is that a large segment of Americans do not pay taxes and instead free ride off of our society.  The Hamilton Project explores this myth and finds that virtually all Americans will pay some form of tax during their lifetime. 

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Hamilton Project Updates

A periodic newsletter of events, policy briefs, and working papers from The Hamilton Project.